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Drug Interactions With Eletriptan - Forms of Syringomyelia

This page contains links to eMedTV Nervous System Articles containing information on subjects from Drug Interactions With Eletriptan to Forms of Syringomyelia. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Drug Interactions With Eletriptan
    Drug interactions with eletriptan may involve medications such as certain antidepressants and triptans. This eMedTV Web page discusses some potential drug interactions involving eletriptan and the effects of such interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Entacapone
    Probenecid, MAOIs, and cholestyramine could potentially cause drug interactions with entacapone. This eMedTV resource provides a list of other medicines that may interact with entacapone and explains the potential risks of these interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Ethosuximide
    Drug interactions with ethosuximide can occur when it is taken with valproic acid or other medications. This eMedTV segment provides a list of medications that can interact with ethosuximide, as well as the problems these interactions can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Ethotoin
    This eMedTV resource takes a look at various products that may not be safe to use in combination with ethotoin, including warfarin and calcium-containing antacids. This article also explains the problems these drug interactions can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Extended-Release Lamotrigine
    As this eMedTV selection explains, several medicines, such as birth control pills, Equetro, or Tegretol, can cause extended-release lamotrigine drug interactions. This resource offers a more detailed list of possible interactions and their effects.
  • Drug Interactions With Ezogabine
    As this eMedTV page discusses, some of the drugs that may cause interactions with ezogabine include phenytoin, digoxin, and alcohol. This article lists other products that may cause problems and explains what your doctor may do to minimize any risks.
  • Drug Interactions With Felbamate
    Certain problems can occur when felbamate is taken with phenytoin, birth control pills, or other drugs. This eMedTV page lists some medicines that can cause felbamate drug interactions and explains what your doctor may suggest to avoid problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Fingolimod
    This eMedTV Web resource takes an in-depth look at medications that may cause drug interactions with fingolimod, such as beta blockers, immunosuppressants, and vaccines. This page lists other products that can cause potentially serious complications.
  • Drug Interactions With Glatiramer
    It is not known if other medicines will cause drug interactions with glatiramer. As this eMedTV Web page explains, while there are no known drug interactions, it is important to understand that glatiramer has not been tested with most other drugs.
  • Drug Interactions With Interferon Beta-1a
    Chemotherapy, zidovudine, and theophylline may cause drug interactions with interferon beta-1a. This eMedTV article lists specific zidovudine and theophylline products that may interact with interferon beta-1a and describes their potential effects.
  • Drug Interactions With Interferon Beta-1b
    Zidovudine and theophylline are medicines that may cause drug interactions with interferon beta-1b. As this eMedTV Web page explains, interferon beta-1b interactions can lead to high drug levels in your blood and increase your risk for side effects.
  • Drug Interactions With Lacosamide
    As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions may occur if you combine certain medications with lacosamide. This article further discusses drug interactions with lacosamide, including a list of medications that may interfere with this seizure medicine.
  • Drug Interactions With Levetiracetam
    There are currently no known drug interactions with levetiracetam. This part of the eMedTV site explains the results of studies involving levetiracetam and other medications, and describes what to do before you take levetiracetam with other drugs.
  • Drug Interactions With Levetiracetam XR
    At this point, there are no known drug interactions with levetiracetam XR. However, as this eMedTV page explains, levetiracetam XR has not been studied in combination with every drug. It is possible that there are currently unknown drug interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Naratriptan
    Naratriptan may interact with other triptans, ergot medicines, and some antidepressants. This eMedTV resource discusses drug interactions with naratriptan and these other medications, including information about effects of such interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Orally Disintegrating Carbidopa-Levodopa
    Certain drug interactions with orally disintegrating carbidopa-levodopa can raise your risk of side effects. This eMedTV page lists the drugs that can negatively interact with orally disintegrating carbidopa-levodopa, such as MAOIs and antipsychotics.
  • Drug Interactions With Orally Disintegrating Selegiline
    Certain drug interactions with orally disintegrating selegiline can raise your risk of side effects. This eMedTV page lists medicines that can negatively interact with orally disintegrating selegiline, such as certain antidepressants and stimulants.
  • Drug Interactions With Oxcarbazepine
    Tegretol, Calan, and Dilantin are some of the drugs that can potentially interact with oxcarbazepine. This eMedTV Web page discusses some possible drug interactions with oxcarbazepine and explains the problems that these interactions can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Oxcarbazepine Extended-Release
    This eMedTV page describes how serious side effects or other complications may occur when oxcarbazepine extended-release is combined with certain diuretics and other drugs. Various interactions are discussed, along with ways to avoid problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Perampanel
    As this eMedTV resource explains, perampanel can interact with several drugs, including Abilify, Cerebyx, and Mycobutin. This article explores the results of these interactions and offers suggestions on how to minimize your risk for complications.
  • Drug Interactions With Phenytoin
    Alcohol, quinidine, and warfarin may potentially cause drug interactions with phenytoin. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains what other drugs may cause phenytoin interactions and describes the possible risks of combining them with phenytoin.
  • Drug Interactions With Rasagiline
    Stimulants, atomoxetine, and pressors are medicines that may cause drug interactions with rasagiline. This eMedTV segment lists other products that may interact with rasagiline and explains the potential dangers of these drug interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Rizatriptan
    This section of the eMedTV library lists drugs that can potentially interact with rizatriptan (such as MAOIs and ergot medications) and describes how drug interactions with rizatriptan can put you at risk of dangerous side effects, among other things.
  • Drug Interactions With Rufinamide
    Certain problems can occur when rufinamide is taken with phenytoin, birth control pills, or other drugs. This eMedTV page lists some medicines that can cause drug interactions with rufinamide and explains what your doctor may suggest to avoid problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Sumatriptan
    MAOIs and triptans are among the drugs that can potentially interact with sumatriptan. This eMedTV Web page describes how drug interactions with sumatriptan can raise the level of sumatriptan in your blood or your risk of dangerous side effects.
  • Drug Interactions With Sumatriptan Transdermal
    Your doctor may recommend avoiding certain medications while you are using sumatriptan transdermal. This eMedTV article examines various products that can cause sumatriptan transdermal drug interactions. It also discusses how to reduce your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Teriflunomide
    FluMist, Arava, and Taxol are some of the products that can cause drug interactions with teriflunomide. This eMedTV selection takes a closer look at other products that may interfere with teriflunomide and describes the problems that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Tiagabine
    Alcohol, Dilantin, and Luminal are a few of the drugs that can interact with tiagabine. This eMedTV article discusses in detail several other drug interactions with tiagabine, explaining some of the problems that can occur as a result.
  • Drug Interactions With Tolcapone
    Some drug interactions with tolcapone can cause your body to metabolize the drug differently than intended. This eMedTV resource lists several medications that may interact with tolcapone and explains the negative effects of these interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Trihexyphenidyl
    Pramlintide and anticholinergic drugs may cause drug interactions with trihexyphenidyl. This eMedTV article lists other drugs that may interact with trihexyphenidyl. Drug interactions may increase your risk of side effects, such as nausea or dry eyes.
  • Drug Interactions With Vigabatrin
    This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at the products that may not be safe to use in combination with vigabatrin, including clonazepam and phenytoin. This article also describes the problems these drug interactions with vigabatrin can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Zolmitriptan
    This eMedTV page lists numerous drugs that can possibly interact with zolmitriptan -- such as other triptans, ergot medicines, and cimetidine -- and describes how drug interactions with zolmitriptan may lead to dangerous side effects in some people.
  • Drug Interactions With Zonisamide
    Drug interactions can occur when zonisamide is taken with carbamazepine, phenytoin, or several other drugs. This eMedTV Web page discusses these drug interactions with zonisamide, with information on the potentially negative effects that can occur.
  • Dyssynergia Cerebellaris Myoclonica
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, dyssynergia cerebellaris myoclonica is a collection of rare neurological disorders characterized by epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and myoclonus. This article discusses dyssynergia cerebellaris myoclonica in detail.
  • Eastern Equine Encephalitis
    Eastern equine encephalitis is a mosquito-borne viral disease that can affect the central nervous system. This eMedTV resource discusses the causes, symptoms, transmission, and prevention of this disease.
  • Effects of Spina Bifida
    The effects of spina bifida can range from minor physical problems to severe physical disabilities. This eMedTV article discusses the effects of spina bifida, which are determined by several factors involving the spinal malformation.
  • Eldapryl
    Eldepryl is a prescription medicine used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV Web article takes brief look at Eldepryl and provides a link to more detailed information on the drug. Eldapryl is a common misspelling of Eldepryl.
  • Eldepryl
    Eldepryl is approved to treat Parkinson's disease in combination with carbidopa-levodopa medications. This eMedTV Web page offers an overview of this medicine, including information on possible side effects, dosing information, and general precautions.
  • Eldepryl and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV segment explains that women are usually advised to avoid Eldepryl (selegiline hydrochloride) while breastfeeding. No studies have been done on Eldepryl and breastfeeding, but this drug could potentially cause problems in a nursing infant.
  • Eldepryl and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV Web article explains that animal studies on Eldepryl and pregnancy indicate that the drug may cause harm to a fetus. This page describes the problems that Eldepryl may cause (such as miscarriages and stillbirths).
  • Eldepryl Dosage
    The standard recommended Eldepryl dosage for Parkinson's disease is 5 mg twice a day. This eMedTV page explains that Eldepryl is only approved for use in combination with carbidopa-levodopa medicines. This page also provides some dosing tips.
  • Eldepryl Drug Interactions
    If you take certain medicines with Eldepryl, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV page provides a list of products that can interact with Eldepryl, such as certain antidepressants and stimulants. This page also describes the problems that can occur.
  • Eldepryl Medication Information
    If you are looking for information on Eldepryl, this eMedTV Web page is a great place to start. This article describes this Parkinson's medication in some detail, with information on dosing guidelines, side effects, and safety warnings.
  • Eldepryl Overdose
    This eMedTV article explains that seizures, hallucinations, and difficulty breathing are possible symptoms of an Eldepryl overdose. This page lists other symptoms that may occur and describes various treatment options.
  • Eldepryl Side Effects
    This eMedTV article explains that although many people do not experience any problems with Eldepryl, side effects are possible. This page takes an in-depth look at some of the common and serious side effects of this Parkinson's medication.
  • Eldepryl Uses
    Eldepryl is mainly used for treating Parkinson's disease. This selection from the eMedTV Web site takes a detailed look at Eldepryl uses, including how it works to increase dopamine levels in the brain and several off-label uses of the medication.
  • Eldepryl Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV resource provides several important Eldepryl warnings and precautions that you should be aware of before starting the medicine. For example, you should not use the drug if you are taking certain medications or if you have certain allergies.
  • Eletriptan
    Eletriptan is a prescription drug used to treat migraines; it is not used to prevent them. This eMedTV article explains how the medicine relieves migraine symptoms, lists some potential side effects, and offers tips on how to take the medication.
  • Eletriptan Dosing
    The usual dose of eletriptan used to treat a migraine is 20 mg or 40 mg. As this eMedTV page explains, you shouldn't take more than 80 mg of eletriptan in one day. This article discusses eletriptan dosing guidelines and explains how to take the drug.
  • Eletriptan HBr
    If you get migraine headaches, you may be interested in a drug called eletriptan hydrobromide (HBr). This eMedTV page gives an overview of this migraine treatment, explaining how it works and when it is taken. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Eletriptan Side Effects
    Side effects of eletriptan may include drowsiness, nausea, and dizziness. This section of the eMedTV library discusses common and rare eletriptan side effects, including those that may be signs of serious health problems.
  • Encefalitas
    As this eMedTV page explains, encephalitis is an inflammation of the brain that is typically caused by certain types of infections. This page also covers possible symptoms and treatment options. Encefalitas is a common misspelling of encephalitis.
  • Encefalitis
    As this eMedTV page explains, encephalitis is an inflammation of the brain that can be caused by certain infections. This article discusses who is at the highest risk of developing encephalitis. Encefalitis is a common misspelling of encephalitis.
  • Encephalities
    Encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) is a condition that can lead to brain damage, seizures, and death. This eMedTV resource discusses this condition and provides a link to more information. Encephalities is a common misspelling of encephalitis.
  • Encephalitis
    Each year, several thousand people contract encephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at encephalitis, including its causes, symptoms, and treatment options.
  • Encephalitis Diagnosis
    As this eMedTV article explains, an encephalitis diagnosis involves the doctor asking questions, performing a physical exam, and (possibly) ordering various tests. This page provides detailed information on the process of diagnosing encephalitis.
  • Encephalitis Lethargica
    Encephalitis lethargica is a disease that causes fever, delayed physical response, and lethargy. This eMedTV Web page provides a detailed description of this medical condition, with information on possible symptoms, treatment options, and more.
  • Encephalitis Symptoms
    People with encephalitis symptoms often show signs of mild flu-like illness. This eMedTV page offers an overview of this topic and explains that more severe signs and symptoms of encephalitis include double vision, hallucinations, and muscle weakness.
  • Encephalitis Treatment
    Antiviral drugs, bed rest, and anticonvulsants are a few types of encephalitis treatment. As this eMedTV page explains, people who are suspected of having encephalitis should receive immediate treatment. This page describes encephalitis treatment.
  • Encephelitis
    Encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) is a condition that can be caused by infection of the spinal cord. This eMedTV page takes a look at encephalitis and provides a link to more information. Encephelitis is a common misspelling of encephalitis.
  • Encephilitis
    Encephalitis is caused when a viral or bacterial infection causes inflammation of the brain. This eMedTV article takes a further look at encephalitis, including possible risk factors and symptoms. Encephilitis is a common misspelling of encephalitis.
  • Entacapone
    Entacapone is a drug that is often prescribed with carbidopa-levodopa for treating Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of this medication, explains how it works, includes dosing information, and more.
  • Entacapone Dosage
    The recommended entacapone dosage is one tablet taken with each dose of carbidopa-levodopa. This eMedTV Web page discusses entacapone dosing in more detail and offers information on when and how to take this Parkinson's medication.
  • Entacapone Drug Information
    Entacapone is used in conjunction with other medications for Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV article gives some basic information on entacapone, explaining how to take this drug, what to discuss with your doctor before starting treatment, and more.
  • Enzephalitis
    When a person has encephalitis, he or she may have a sudden fever, headaches, or confusion. This eMedTV page further discusses encephalitis, including potential treatment options. Enzephalitis is a common misspelling of encephalitis.
  • Equine Encephalitis
    Equine encephalitis is an inflammation of the brain that affects horses and humans. As this eMedTV article explains, there are three types: eastern, western, and Venezuelan. This page describes these different types, including symptoms and prognosis.
  • Ethosuximide
    Ethosuximide is a drug that may be prescribed to treat absence seizures in people with epilepsy. This eMedTV Web page further discusses this prescription medicine, including information on its effects, dosing guidelines, and possible side effects.
  • Ethosuximide Dosing
    For adults and children (age six and up), the recommended starting ethosuximide dose is 250 mg twice daily. This eMedTV resource offers information on the ethosuximide dosing guidelines your doctor will follow to determine your dose.
  • Ethosuximide Medication Information
    This eMedTV resource offers some basic information on ethosuximide, a medication used to treat absence seizures in adults and children. This article discusses side effects, dosing, and important drug warnings. A link to more details is also included.
  • Ethotoin
    Ethotoin tablets are taken four to six times daily to help control certain types of seizures. This eMedTV Web selection features more information on this prescription drug, including who may benefit from it, dosing tips, potential side effects, and more.
  • Ethotoin Dosage
    This eMedTV segment examines how your doctor will determine an appropriate ethotoin dosage. This article also offers suggestions on when and how to take this medication, such as taking each dose after eating and when to take it during the day.
  • Ethotoin Drug Information
    People who have grand mal seizures or complex partial seizures may benefit from ethotoin. This eMedTV page contains more information on ethotoin, including how the drug works to control seizures, general dosing instructions, and safety issues.
  • Ethotoin Side Effects
    As this eMedTV page explains, ethotoin side effects may include dizziness, headaches, and insomnia. This article explains why limited information is available on possible reactions to this drug and discusses when problems require immediate medical care.
  • Extended-Release Lamotrigine
    Extended-release lamotrigine is a medicine that treats seizures. This selection from the eMedTV library provides an overview of this drug, including information on how it works, possible side effects, how to take it, and more.
  • Extended-Release Lamotrigine Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, extended-release lamotrigine is usually taken once a day. This article covers the guidelines for extended-release lamotrigine dosing, with a discussion of the factors that will affect the exact amount prescribed.
  • Ezogabine
    Ezogabine is a medication used to treat partial-onset seizures in adults. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at this prescription drug, including details on how it works, potential side effects, and safety precautions to be aware of.
  • Ezogabine Dosage
    As this eMedTV article discusses, your ezogabine dose will depend on your age and other medical conditions you may have, among other factors. This page further explores these other factors and offers some recommendations on when and how to take this drug.
  • Ezogabine Drug Information
    This eMedTV resource presents some general information on ezogabine, a drug prescribed to control partial-onset seizures in adults. This page also discusses general dosing guidelines and safety precautions. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Febral Seizure
    Febrile seizures are convulsions brought on by a fever in infants or small children. This eMedTV article talks about why these occur and provides a link to more detailed information. Febral seizure is a common misspelling of febrile seizures.
  • Febrile Seizures
    Febrile seizures are convulsive attacks brought on by fever in small children or infants. As this eMedTV article explains, these seizures are not considered a form of epilepsy and do not cause brain damage.
  • Felbamate
    A doctor may prescribe felbamate to treat partial seizures and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This page of the eMedTV site offers an in-depth look at this drug, providing information on its dosing, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Felbamate Dosage
    The recommended starting felbamate dosage will be based on several factors, such as your age and weight. This eMedTV segment offers general dosing guidelines for treating certain types of seizures and lists tips on when and how to take felbamate.
  • Felbamate Drug Information
    Felbamate is a prescription epilepsy medicine used to control seizures in adults and children. This eMedTV Web article offers more information on felbamate, explaining the drug's specific uses, possible side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Fingolimid
    Available by prescription only, fingolimod is used for treating multiple sclerosis (MS). This eMedTV Web selection explains how this medication is taken, how it helps treat MS, and possible side effects. Fingolimid is a common misspelling of fingolimod.
  • Fingolimod
    Fingolimod is a drug prescribed to treat multiple sclerosis. This selection from the eMedTV Web library takes an in-depth look at this medication, including details on how it works, dosing guidelines, potential side effects, safety concerns, and more.
  • Fingolimod Dosage
    This eMedTV article explains that when treating multiple sclerosis with fingolimod, the dosage is the same for everyone. This page further discusses dosing guidelines and lists several important tips for when and how to take this drug.
  • Fingolimod Drug Information
    Fingolimod is a prescription medication used to treat multiple sclerosis. This eMedTV page offers more information on fingolimod, explaining the drug's dosing guidelines and possible side effects. A link to more details is also included.
  • First Aid for Seizures
    As this eMedTV article explains, helping someone who is having a seizure may involve moving any sharp objects out of the way and turning the person on his or her side. This page lists actions you can take when providing first aid for seizures.
  • Forms of Syringomyelia
    There are two forms of syringomyelia: communicating and non-communicating. This eMedTV article discusses these forms of syringomyelia in detail, including how they occur, who develops them, and what their symptoms are.
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