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Acoustic Neuroma Diagnosis - Cause of Huntington's Disease

This page contains links to eMedTV Nervous System Articles containing information on subjects from Acoustic Neuroma Diagnosis to Cause of Huntington's Disease. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • About Huntington's Disease
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Huntington's disease is a progressive brain condition. This article gives a brief overview of Huntington's disease, including details about its symptoms, treatment, and diagnosis.
  • About Syringomyelia
    This eMedTV page gives a brief description of syringomyelia, a condition in which a cyst forms within the spinal cord. This article discusses causes and symptoms, and also includes a link to more in-depth information about syringomyelia.
  • Acoustic Neuroma
    An acoustic neuroma is a noncancerous, slow-growing tumor that grows from certain nerves of the inner ear. This eMedTV article discusses this serious condition in detail, including its causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and more.
  • Acoustic Neuroma Diagnosis
    Making an accurate acoustic neuroma diagnosis requires a medical history, physical exam, and neurological exam. Each step is presented in this eMedTV article, as well as additional information on making an acoustic neuroma diagnosis.
  • Acoustic Neuroma Gene
    It's believed that problems in a specific gene on chromosome 22 can lead to acoustic neuroma. Malfunctions in this "acoustic neuroma gene" can lead to a tumor. This eMedTV article discusses the acoustic neuroma gene in detail.
  • Acoustic Neuroma Research
    Acoustic neuroma research studies aim to answer important questions and find out whether new approaches are safe and effective. The eMedTV library contains in-depth information on the progress acoustic neuroma research scientists are making.
  • Acoustic Neuroma Surgery
    The goal of acoustic neuroma surgery is to maintain hearing while removing the entire tumor. This eMedTV article discusses this procedure in detail, including possible alternatives and addresses possible complications and the recovery process.
  • Acoustic Neuroma Surgery Recovery
    The length of a person's acoustic neuroma surgery recovery depends on a few factors, but generally requires 4 to 6 days in the hospital. The information in this eMedTV article covers the process of acoustic neuroma surgery recovery in detail.
  • Acoustic Neuroma Symptoms
    Ringing in the ear, high-tone hearing loss, dizziness, are some of the early symptoms of acoustic neuroma. This eMedTV article explores the different acoustic neuroma symptoms and explains what to do if they occur.
  • Acoustic Neuroma Treatment
    Acoustic neuroma treatment options can include surgical removal of the tumor, radiation, or watchful waiting. The various acoustic neuroma treatment options are described in this eMedTV article and links to additional information are provided.
  • Acoustic Neuromas
    This eMedTV page explains how acoustic neuromas (tumors that develop from nerves in the inner ear) can lead to hearing loss, dizziness, and headaches. Treatment options and a possible genetic link are also discussed.
  • Acustic Neurinoma
    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that comes from an overproduction of cells that support certain nerves of the inner ear. This eMedTV page describes the 2 types of acoustic neuroma. Acustic neurinoma is a common misspelling of acoustic neuroma.
  • Acustic Neuroma
    Acustic neuroma is a common misspelling of acoustic neuroma. An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops from certain nerves of the inner ear. The eMedTV library contains in-depth information about acoustic neuroma and related topics.
  • Apomorphine
    Apomorphine is a medication prescribed to treat "off" episodes of Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV Web resource takes an in-depth look at the drug, including information on how it works, when and how to take it, possible side effects, and more.
  • Apomorphine Dosage
    This eMedTV page discusses the factors that may affect your apomorphine dosage and provides some general tips for when and how to take this medication. The typical starting apomorphine dose is 0.2 mL injected as needed, up to five times daily.
  • Apomorphine Hydrochloride Drug Info
    This eMedTV article contains information on apomorphine hydrochloride, a drug used to treat certain symptoms of Parkinson's disease. This resource explores side effects, dosing guidelines, and more. Also included is a link to more in-depth information.
  • Bell Palsy
    Bell's palsy is a condition that causes temporary facial paralysis. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of the condition along with a link to additional information. Bell palsy is a common misspelling of Bell's palsy.
  • Bell's Palsy
    A temporary form of facial paralysis, Bell's palsy results from damage or trauma to a facial nerve. As this eMedTV page explains, the condition usually affects only one of the two facial nerves and one side of the face. It often goes away on its own.
  • Bell's Palsy Diagnosis
    While there is no specific test to confirm a Bell's palsy diagnosis, imaging tests may be used to rule out other causes of paralysis. This eMedTV Web page discusses the process a doctor uses when diagnosing Bell's palsy.
  • Bell's Palsy During Pregnancy
    Women may develop the facial paralysis known as Bell's palsy during pregnancy more frequently than the general population. As this eMedTV page explains, the risk of Bell's palsy during pregnancy is thought to be greatest during the third trimester.
  • Bell's Palsy Info
    Are you looking for info on Bell's palsy? This page from the eMedTV site is a good place to start. It describes the usual characteristics of Bell's palsy, possible treatment options, and who it affects. A link to detailed information is also included.
  • Bell's Palsy Recovery Time
    In most cases, it takes about three to six months to recover from Bell's palsy. This section of the eMedTV library discusses the factors affecting the time it takes to experience a full Bell's palsy recovery.
  • Bell's Palsy Research
    Current Bell's palsy research includes attempts to learn more about the circumstances and conditions that cause nerve damage. This eMedTV segment also discusses Bell's palsy research aimed at developing methods to repair damaged nerves.
  • Bell's Palsy Symptoms and Treatment
    As this eMedTV page explains, the symptoms and treatment of Bell's palsy may vary, based on the extent of nerve damage associated with this form of facial paralysis. This article also offers links to additional information.
  • Bell's Palsy Treatment
    Steroids, antiviral drugs, and anti-inflammatory medicines are often employed to treat Bell's palsy. As this eMedTV article explains, surgery is seldom recommended as a treatment option; it is reserved for cases where damage is permanent.
  • Benzotropine
    Benztropine is a prescription drug licensed to treat Parkinson's disease and certain movement disorders. This eMedTV page covers how the medication works, dosing tips, and possible side effects. Benzotropine is a common misspelling of benztropine.
  • Benztropine
    A prescription drug, benztropine is used to treat Parkinson's disease and certain movement disorders. This eMedTV article describes benztropine in more detail, including information on how it works, potential side effects, and general precautions.
  • Benztropine Dosage
    It is recommended to start benztropine at a low dose and slowly increase it. This eMedTV article offers a complete overview of benztropine dosing guidelines for treating Parkinson's disease and similar disorders.
  • Benztropine Mesylate Information
    This eMedTV Web page discusses the prescription medication benztropine mesylate. In this selection, we discuss what it is used for, how to take it, warnings, and more. There is also a link to additional information.
  • Beta Blockers and Orap
    In general, do not combine Orap with beta blockers or other drugs that can cause a change in heart rhythm. This eMedTV page describes the potentially life-threatening problems that may occur and offers a link to info on drug interactions with Orap.
  • Biperiden
    Biperiden is a medicine licensed to treat Parkinson's disease and certain movement problems. This eMedTV segment covers biperiden uses in more detail, describes the possible side effects of the drug, and offers some tips on when and how to take it.
  • Biperiden Dosage
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site provides general biperiden dosing guidelines for treating Parkinson's disease and extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) caused by other medications. This article also offers some tips on taking your biperiden dosage.
  • Biperiden Hydrochloride Information
    This eMedTV selection provides information on biperiden hydrochloride, a medication used to treat Parkinson's disease and other conditions. This article explains how it works, what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and more.
  • Bonine
    Bonine is an over-the-counter medication commonly used for treating and preventing motion sickness. This eMedTV resource describes how the drug works, explains when and how to take it, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Bonine Dosage
    There is only one standard recommended dosage for Bonine, regardless of your age or weight. As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended dose for treating or preventing motion sickness is one or two tablets daily (usually one hour before embarkation).
  • Bonine Drug Information
    Bonine is an antihistamine used for treating and preventing motion sickness. In this eMedTV article, you will find more information about the non-prescription drug Bonine, including details on how it works and how often it should be taken.
  • Bonine Drug Interactions
    Alcohol, pramlintide, and certain other medications may cause drug interactions with Bonine. As this eMedTV segment explains, these drug interactions could increase your risk for developing side effects, such as excessive drowsiness or confusion.
  • Bonine for Motion Sickness
    Compared to many other drugs used for motion sickness, Bonine lasts much longer and causes less drowsiness. This eMedTV resource describes the specific effects of Bonine and discusses the use of this medication in children.
  • Bonine Side Effects
    Potential side effects of Bonine include blurred vision, drowsiness, and increased appetite. This eMedTV article lists other possible side effects of the drug, including potentially serious problems that should be reported to your doctor immediately.
  • Bonine Uses
    Bonine is approved for the treatment and prevention of motion sickness in both adults and children. This eMedTV Web page describes how this medication works to minimize the symptoms of motion sickness and also discusses off-label uses for Bonine.
  • Bonine Warnings and Precautions
    Bonine can cause breathing problems in people with asthma or COPD. This eMedTV article covers other precautions and warnings with Bonine, including a list of other possible side effects and information on who should not use this particular drug.
  • Brand Name for Dantrolene
    As this eMedTV segment explains, brand-name dantrolene is sold under the name Dantrium. This article take a closer look at this prescription drug, including what it is used for, whether there are generics, and a link to more details.
  • Cancer and Carmustine
    People with certain types of cancer may benefit from chemotherapy treatment with carmustine. This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at how this medicine works, what it is approved to treat, and possible off-label uses. It also links to more details.
  • Carbidopa-Levodopa
    Carbidopa-levodopa is a medicine licensed to treat Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism. This eMedTV segment explains carbidopa-levodopa uses in more detail, including possible side effects of the drug and helpful tips on taking the medicine.
  • Carbidopa-Levodopa Dosage
    This portion of the eMedTV Web site provides general carbidopa-levodopa dosing guidelines. Typically, the recommended starting carbidopa-levodopa dosage is 25-100 mg three times daily. This page also provides tips on how to take the medication.
  • Carbidopa-Levodopa-Entacapone
    Carbidopa-levodopa-entacapone is a medication often prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV resource explains how carbidopa-levodopa-entacapone works, describes its effects, and offers dosing information for the drug.
  • Carbidopa-Levodopa-Entacapone Dosage
    Your carbidopa-levodopa-entacapone dosage will be determined by your current carbidopa-levodopa dose. This eMedTV page lists other factors that may help determine your carbidopa-levodopa-entacapone dose and offers tips for taking the medication.
  • Carbidopa-Levodopa-Entacapone Info
    People looking for info on carbidopa-levodopa-entacapone will find this eMedTV resource a great starting place. This page explains when this medication is prescribed for Parkinson's disease and what to discuss with the healthcare provider prescribing it.
  • Carmustin
    Carmustine is a chemotherapy drug prescribed to treat brain tumors, multiple myeloma, and lymphomas. This eMedTV article examines this drug, including what it is used for, how it is given, and how it works. Carmustin is a common misspelling of carmustine.
  • Carmustine
    Carmustine is an injectable medicine prescribed to treat various tumors and cancers. This eMedTV page examines the benefits of this chemotherapy drug, with details on what it is approved to treat, how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Carmustine Dosage
    This eMedTV resource explains how your carmustine dose is determined and also includes some helpful tips on what to expect during chemotherapy treatment with this drug. This article also explores why your blood cell counts will be carefully monitored.
  • Carmustine Drug Information
    Carmustine is licensed to treat several types of cancer in adults. This eMedTV Web selection contains more information on this drug, including how carmustine is given, specific uses, and possible side effects. A link to more details is also included.
  • Carmustine Side Effects
    You may experience nausea, lung problems, or chest pain during chemotherapy treatment with carmustine. This eMedTV page provides a description of other possible side effects of carmustine and explains which reactions require immediate medical attention.
  • Cause of Encephalitis
    As this eMedTV article explains, the causes of encephalitis can include enteroviruses, arboviruses, and bites from rabid animals. This segment takes a closer look at causes of this disease, including information on Lyme disease as a possible cause.
  • Cause of Huntington's Disease
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Huntington's disease is caused by a defect in a gene that results in the creation of an abnormal protein. This article explains how this abnormal protein affects certain nerve cells.
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